After three decades, most polluted U.S. neighborhoods haven't changed

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License

Creative Commons Licence

Creator(s)

Contributors

Contributed date

August 3, 2020 - 3:02am

Critical Commentary

This article reflects on the disparate levels of air pollution faced by specific communities, usually low-income communities and communities where people of color reside. More specifically, the article also addresses the ways in which disparate exposure also changes the risk of developing respiratory illnesses and cancer. We can think of this articles in terms of the implications respiratory illnesses and developing cancer has on these communities as particularly situated in th COVID-19 pandemic and as increasing the chances of developing serious complications from the virus.  

Source

Groom, N. (2020, July 30). "After three decades, most polluted U.S. neighborhoods haven't changed." Reuters. Retrieved from https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-environment-pollution/after-three...

Group Audience

Cite as

Nichola Groom, "After three decades, most polluted U.S. neighborhoods haven't changed", contributed by Briana Leone, The Energy Rights Project, Platform for Experimental Collaborative Ethnography, last modified 3 August 2020, accessed 26 November 2022. https://energyrights.info/content/after-three-decades-most-polluted-us-neighborhoods-havent-changed